Thursday, February 11, 2010

Amiri Baraka on African-American literature

Nope, I didn’t forget it was Black History Month. Just been busy is all.

I always like to do something a little deeper for February. Particularly I’m into audio artifacts (such as an actual phone conversation between Martin Luther King and President Lyndon Johnson).

Today, I’m sharing a 1984 classroom lecture by Amiri Baraka, the writer and radical-left activist, on the development of black literature.

Click here to hear a 9-minute excerpt. For the entire 95-minute sound file, follow this link to Internet Archive.

This lecture – delivered at Naropa University in Colorado – is part of the Naropa Poetics Audio Archive, a repository of hipness that demands further examination.

The Internet is a free university at your fingertips, y’all. Blows my mind sometimes.

Anyway, Baraka begins with a reference to his essay collection “Daggers and Javelins,” which was published in ’84.

5 comments:

Thrasher said...

WHite folks like UBM engaged in overkill to validate themsleves during Black History Month...UBM is in overdrive..

Enough White Boy..Enough..

Daniel Hoffmann-Gill said...

Tedious racist Thrasher aside, that's some fine audio, thanks for turning me on to it/

Undercover Black Man said...

^ Cheers.

Shadow And Act said...

The Internet is a free university at your fingertips, y’all. Blows my mind sometimes.

I know! Every time I'm on, I think similar thoughts. I don't think there's ever been a time when information has been this readily and widely accessible.

My problem is that it can be overwhelming! But I can't complain...

I watched "Dutchman" recently - the 1966 film based on the play - for the first time, and it inspired some ideas for a short film which I'm currently writing.

Undercover Black Man said...

I don't think there's ever been a time when information has been this readily and widely accessible.

And yet... ignorance, rumor and hoaxes prevail. Ain't that a bitch?

;^)